Burning Nights CRPS Support is a UK national charity dedicated to raising awareness of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)
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2019-09-09
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1:30 pm

Join us for the Dorsal Root Ganglion stimulation for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) webinar on Monday 16 September 2019, starting at 1.30pm GMT. The speaker for this fantastic webinar will be Mr James Fitzgerald, Consultant Neurosurgeon.

Webinar: Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulation for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

16 September @ 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Online United Kingdom + Google Map
Free

Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulation for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) Webinar Burning Nights CRPS Support has been working with Abbott and Mr James FitzGerald, Consultant Neurosurgeon, to bring you this fantastic webinar. Living with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is difficult, however knowing and understanding the treatment options available to you is crucial. Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) stimulation is a new and innovative treatment for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). This webinar talks about all aspects of Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulation (DRG) stimulation for CRPS. This DRG webinar is a free event and is taking place on Monday 16 September 2019 and will start at 1.30pm GMT. You will also be able to ask James live questions at the end of the webinar. You don't have to be based in the UK to join this webinar, as it is applicable worldwide. The language of the webinar will be in English. A webinar is an online presentation where you can interact with the speakers usually at the end of the presentation. The link you need to join the webinar is DRG WEBINAR or you can click on the blue ‘DRG for CRPS’ button link below. The speaker for this webinar, Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulation for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is Mr James FitzGerald. James FitzGerald is a Consultant Neurosurgeon at the University of Oxford and John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford.  He studied Physics at Oxford University, graduating in 1992, then Medicine, also at Oxford, graduating in 1998.  He obtained a PhD in neuroelectronic interfacing at the University of Cambridge in 2010, before returning to Oxford to take up his present position in 2012.  His work focuses on implanted electronic devices that interface directly with parts of the nervous system.  Clinically he specialises in implanted neurostimulator devices, such as Deep Brain Stimulators, Spinal Cord Stimulators, and Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulators for conditions including Parkinson's disease and chronic severe pain.

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